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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
WETA
Nov 3, 2012 6:30pm EDT
obama comes in with the same kind of promise and the political sciences say george bush was the most polarized presidency. it's a condition of life and what obama's hoping is that republicans if he's re-elected sort of collapse a little bit in exhaustion and work with him in a short period of time. >> and regardless if it's a popular electoral split, it's going to be close. almost 50% of the country will feel disenchanted with whoever is elected. and the fault lines will be quite amazing. >> let's talk about where we were last week. it felt like there was momentum in mitt romney's direction. where are they tonight? >> there was some momentum still building off that successful denver debate. and then it sort of hit the reality of two more debates after that and the continuing campaign. and i think that this momentum was starting to slow before the hurricane hit. but certainly the hurricane had a piece of this. the fact that the president gets to look presidential. you had him up there with his bomber jacket in air force one. >> and chris christie of endorsed hip. -- hymn. >> -- endors
WETA
Oct 28, 2012 9:30am EDT
to protect a woman's life or health because of "advances in science and technology.". and representative todd akin's infamous remark about women's bodies shutting down to prevent pregnancy in cases of so-called "legitimate rape." >> so doctor, are these extreme remarks by republicans distancing themselves from these remarks, are they what are keeping abortion front and center? >> they are actions. they remind women of people trying to redefine rain rape. the words are bad enough. the actions are worse. >> i disagree, bonnie. i think it's to the less advantaged to keep this conversation going. most of them are concerned about the state of the economy and jobs and that's what they are going to the whole thinking about. >> what we know is abortion is the leading topic for women. 39% to 19% to the economy. with the electorate being 56% women, swing voters being a key women demographic, the candidates and the campaigns need to address the issue and have to be in front of it. that's why they are trying to make it an issue. >> i laugh because murdoch's comment along with todd aki
WETA
Oct 30, 2012 7:00pm EDT
alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the giant hybrid storm named sandy left a growing toll today. officials reported at least 39 people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in places after a night of fear, fire and floods. a record storm surge of 13 feet poured into parts of lower manhattan, brooklyn, and queens as sandy hit. the rush of water closed major commuter tunnels linking manhattan with otherboros contributing to the worst damage to the subway system in its 108 years. >> last night we could look down this street here and we saw the river coming toward us and it actually looked l
WETA
Oct 27, 2012 6:30pm EDT
down to science -- numbers-crunching, door-knocking, message-crafting science. and that extends to politics at every level, including a critical group of tight senate races. at this point does anyone really know what is going to dies -- decide all this, gloria? >> no. [laughter] look, it's coming coup -- down to a smaller and smaller group of undecided voters. if you ralk -- talk to republicans, the karl rove theory is that this late in the race, undecided rote -- voters will go to the challenger. if you talk to workers for president obama they say that's not the case. others say they might just stay home and decide not to vote. what you saw in those clips you were just showing it the candidates making their closing arguments because in the end after all the negative ads, which i think at this point probably cancel each other out and it's just a lot of noise out there right now, it comes down to a matter of trust. what -- who do you trust? whose character do you really believe in? and overall whose opt tism -- optimism do you kind of buy into? >> we have heard mitt romney with a sl
WETA
Oct 30, 2012 11:30pm EDT
presidential election and all 35 senate races. he writes about the art and science of prediction and the signal and the noise, by so many predictions, why so many predictions fail and some don't i am pleased to have nate silver back at this table, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> so where do you based on your polling, see the presidential race at this moment? >> we have obama as a modest favorite still and i should say it is not my polling what we go is look at everyone easels poll and average them together and think about the electorial college if you look at ohio still, obama is ahead in most polls of ohio he is ahead in most polls of iowa, wisconsin, and nevada as well and those four states. >> rose: by two or three points. >> two or three-point not an overwhelming margin but you can look historically and how often does a candidate who has a two or three-point lead in an election, does he how often does he convert that to a win and the answer is about 75 percent of the time. >> rose: so you said 75 percent likely obama will be elected? >> that's right because the states are
WETA
Nov 3, 2012 12:30am EDT
transitional science institute's and is the ok.hor of the new boat it is great to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> how will the digital revolution creates a better health care? >> you are used to digitize books and music. how about people? we can get through sequencing once genome. basically everything fed makes you take -- that makes you tick we can change medicine. tavis: give me examples. >> let's say we want to change the cardiogram, and i want to use the smartphone. i have a couple of sensors. i put my finger on the sensor, and i basically have my cardiogram. i can do yours if you would like. if you want to put your fingers on it, there it is. you have a normal heart rhythm. tavis: please tell me that is good. >> you are doing fine. i can look in your heart. i do not need a stethoscope anymore. i am a cardiologists. tavis: how can you be a cardiologists without a stethoscope. >> here is a device where you see everything with high- resolution ultrasound. it is basically the size of a cell phone, and if i want i could do an ultrasound of your heart. we could do it, but
WETA
Nov 4, 2012 10:30am EST
political science at washington college in chestertown, maryland. >> if you think about the god gap, so-called "god gap," it's still alive and well this year in american politics, and it's bigger than things like the gender gap, although you often hear more in the media about women's voting and men's voting, so i think religion continues to play a big role in american presidential elections. >> the republicans are hoping for a big turnout from evangelicals, who make up about one quarter of gop voters. in the early days of the campaign, there were questions about whether theological differences would keep evangelicals from supporting a mormon candidate. governor mitt romney's campaign tried to woo them on the basis of shared values. >> people of different faiths, like yours and mine, sometimes wonder where we can meet in common purpose, when there are so many differences in creed and theology. surely the answer is that we can meet in service, in shared moral convictions about our nation stemming from a common worldview. >> it seems to me that the mormon issue isn't quite as big of a
WETA
Nov 2, 2012 11:30pm EDT
print newspapers so it may be once or twice a week. christian science monitor once a week, "detroit news", cleveland plain, but "newsweek" saying we're just going to do it on-line that is happening it in the print world. not just in newspapers and magazines but obviously books, which is one of the questions why at some point there is at least the question mark where they will be able to continue publishing bound books. >> well, kind of come back though to socially what role books play. you know, sort of this cultural significance of the quote literary author, it really matters to a relatively small number of people. you know it's an elitist thing. there is popular fiction. there is serious nonfiction. you know, which is really in the same category as serious reporting of all kinds. >> you used this phrase elitist twice in this conversation watch. dow mean by that? >> what i mean is the notion by some group that their favorite activity is so important that it needs to be protected. >> what if it were defined differently as a group that says this is part of what you talked about earli
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)